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BRIEF: Stuff for Singles.

COPYRIGHT 2007 Winston-Salem Journal Nov. 1–The Triad chapter of the American Singles Golf Association plays golf every weekend, weather permitting, and meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of every month at Outwest Steakhouse, N.C. 66 South, Kernersville. Singles who enjoy golf are welcome....

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Heat, drought threaten three oaks: Lewisville council OKs landscaper in in bid to save trees.

Posted by Winston Salem | Posted in Winston Salem Journal | Posted on 31-08-2008

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COPYRIGHT 2007 Winston-Salem Journal

Byline: Paul Garber

Nov. 1–LEWISVILLE

Last week’s rainfall brought a reprieve from the hot, dry conditions that have plagued the area since early summer, but it may not be enough to save the three large oak trees in Shallowford Square.

The combination of hot weather and drought conditions has taken a toll on trees, which dominate the landscape of the park and provide shade for visitors to many events held there.

Last month, the town council approved a $4,500 contract with Joe Marion, the owner of Joe’s Landscaping, to try to save the trees, which are believed to be 70 to 75 years old.

“We love the trees,” Mayor Tom Lawson said. “We couldn’t grow trees like that again in our lifetime.”

The work will include adding a four-inch layer of mulch over the ground beneath the trees and improving the irrigation around them.

The trees are on the western edge of the park, between the town’s veterans’ memorial and a small set of swings.

“I think it certainly defines the character of the park up there,” Town Manager Cecil Wood said.

The trees help set the tone of Lewisville as a rural area, he said.

Town officials started noticing problems with the trees earlier this year. A record wave of temperatures in the 90s along with limited rainfall contributed to the problems, Wood said.

Even with the additional help, it’s a possibility that not all three trees will survive, Wood said.

He said that of the three oaks, the most endangered may be the one closest to the swing sets.

“It tends to have more dead limbs in it, and the foliage is not healthy looking,” he said.

Although the summer’s harsh conditions put stress on the trees, Wood said that there also may have been other factors that affected their ability to thrive in the park.

That includes grading around the area as the park was being built, he said.

– Paul Garber can be reached at 727-7327 or at pgarber@wsjournal.com.

To see more of the Winston-Salem Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.journalnow.com/.

Copyright (c) 2007, Winston-Salem Journal, N.C.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

WinstonNet honored for work.

Posted by Winston Salem | Posted in Winston Salem Journal | Posted on 31-08-2008

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COPYRIGHT 2007 Winston-Salem Journal

Byline: M. Paul Jackson

Nov. 1–WinstonNet Inc. said yesterday that it was named one of the Smart21 Communities of 2008 by the Intelligent Community Forum, an international economic-development group.

The forum is based in New York. It aims to help create jobs in the broadband economy throughout the world.

WinstonNet’s first-time recognition highlights the work that the organization has done to promote technology, said Lynda Goff, WinstonNet’s executive director.

“This is a great achievement for our community, and our success is due to the hard work and contributions of WinstonNet members and the entire community of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County,” she said.

WinstonNet, a nonprofit organization, provides computer labs and tutoring services. It was created about seven years ago to help bridge the technology gap among lower-income residents.

The group is also developing a wireless-network system that would provide free or low-cost high-speed Internet access in Forsyth County, but establishing that system has been slow. WinstonNet announced its wireless plan last year and hopes to get the network up in Winston-Salem by the end of the year.

A wireless network is a system that lets computer users tap into the Internet without any cables or telephone hook-ups.

The Smart21 Communities designation recognizes 21 international communities that are developing broadband technologies in their areas, including Oregon, the Netherlands, Korea and South Africa.

WinstonNet was recognized for its work in helping to develop a broadband system to link North Carolina’s universities and schools, according to the forum. “Gaining a place among the Smart21 is the first step toward greater recognition as a community or region that is either positioning itself to prosper, or already is prospering in the digital age,” said John G. Jung, the forum’s chairman.

– M. Paul Jackson can be reached at 727-7473 or at mjackson@wsjournal.com.

To see more of the Winston-Salem Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.journalnow.com/.

Copyright (c) 2007, Winston-Salem Journal, N.C.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Taxes topic of a forum: 10 of candidates for board also discuss incentives.

Posted by Winston Salem | Posted in Winston Salem Journal | Posted on 31-08-2008

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COPYRIGHT 2007 Winston-Salem Journal

Byline: Wesley Young

Nov. 1–KERNERSVILLE

Questions about taxes and city services swirled during last week’s forum for candidates for the Kernersville Board of Aldermen.

Alex McLanahan was the only contender whose schedule didn’t allow him to come to the forum. But five incumbents and five challengers spent 1 1/2 hours fielding questions and making statements.

Aldermen Brooke Cashion, Inez Davis, Dana Jones, Jim Memory and Dawn Morgan participated in the forum. The challengers were Kevin Bugg, Kenny Crews, Calvin O’Briant, Bob Prescott and Harvey Pulliam.

McLanahan had a written statement read to the audience. He called for term limits and said that aldermen should serve without pay.

McLanahan has proposed that an alderman be allowed to serve only two two-year terms in a row before leaving the board.

Cashion said that the town needed to find a better way to allow employees to communicate with the aldermen, and that the next town manager should go through professional testing to determine his leadership style.

Cashion said that she wouldn’t vote to raise property taxes to meet the cost of building projects the town might undertake.

Bugg said that the property-tax rate is not the most important factor and that people come to Kernersville for its quality of life and location. The town’s property-tax rate is 55 cents for every $100 of value.

Bugg called for business recruitment to ease the tax burden on homeA-owners, and said that building a loop road should be the town’s top road priority.

He said he liked the idea of turning Cherry and Main streets into one-way streets to help move traffic. The town should consider a bond referendum for roads.

Morgan said she had voted to raise property taxes for better police protection and that she would continue to work to make public-safety improvements. She said property taxes are too high, but that the town had to balance taxes and the need to provide services. Morgan advocated for several road-widening projects and economic incentives to help companies pay for infrastructure.

Pulliam said that economic incentives would “prostitute Kernersville,” and opposed hiring a director of economic development.

He criticized recreation spending and said that the town should find out why other towns are able to have much lower tax rates. Pulliam said that lots of traffic is an asset and that the town should “nourish” assets such as Korner’s Folly.

Davis emphasized her experience. She said she has voted for economic-development incentives but believes in weighing the cost and benefit in each case.

She said that she had voted to improve sidewalks and that the town needed greenways and bike trails. Davis said that partnerships and land trades with the private sector could create more open spaces.

Crews called for tax cuts and said that the quality of life has nothing to do with spending on parks and recreation. He said that other services could be improved by cutting wasteful spending, and that some town services could be done by private businesses.

Crews said that zoning isn’t done fairly in the town and that everybody should be treated the same way.

Memory said that he is very conservative on taxes but that he would back an increase approved by the voters in a bond referendum.

He said that economic development — such as that brought by the planned Triad Business Park and a new Kernersville hospital — is the only way to lower taxes.

He said he supported the building of a new building for public works.

Prescott said that he favored meetings so that the town can “decide what it wants to be when it grows up.” He called himself a listener.

He said that a committee should do background checks to pick a new town manager, and that the town’s biggest road need is a loop road. Prescott said that the town and citizens should decide whether to make Main and Cherry streets one-way streets.

Jones said she had worked to keep the tax rate down and on economic development and roads. Jones said that the town should consider using housing density as a way to provide more open spaces.

She said that the town should look to developers to provide open spaces as much as possible. She said that a new public-works building is needed, but should be done without a tax increase.

O’Briant said that economic-development incentives are good, and that the town should even consider constructing a building as a recruitment tool.

He said that transportation is the town’s biggest need and that dead-end streets should be eliminated. O’Briant said that greenways and parks as well as housing-density requirements can create more open spaces.

– Wesley Young can be reached at 992-0067 or at wyoung@wsjournal.com.

To see more of the Winston-Salem Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.journalnow.com/.

Copyright (c) 2007, Winston-Salem Journal, N.C.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

BRIEF: Stuff for Singles.

Posted by Winston Salem | Posted in Winston Salem Journal | Posted on 31-08-2008

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COPYRIGHT 2007 Winston-Salem Journal

Nov. 1–The Triad chapter of the American Singles Golf Association plays golf every weekend, weather permitting, and meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second Monday of every month at Outwest Steakhouse, N.C. 66 South, Kernersville.

Singles who enjoy golf are welcome. For more information, call 336-454-8875 or 336-964-5524.

The Winston-Salem Ski and Outing Club meets at 7 p.m. the third Thursday of every month. The group meets to socialize and plan ski trips, bike rides, hikes, outings to sporting events and more.

The meetings are at the Garden Park Apartments Clubhouse on Dalewood Drive, just off Country Club Road.

For more information, see www.wssoc.org, send e-mail to info@wssoc.org or call 816-0348.

To see more of the Winston-Salem Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.journalnow.com/.

Copyright (c) 2007, Winston-Salem Journal, N.C.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Bricolage Arts Festival Schedule.

Posted by Winston Salem | Posted in Winston Salem Journal | Posted on 31-08-2008

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COPYRIGHT 2007 Winston-Salem Journal

Nov. 1–The Bricolage Arts Festival will begin today and run through Sunday at various venues around the Piedmont Triad. The festival is designed to showcase the skills and talents of artists and artisans from the region. It will include music, dance, film and visual arts. Tickets for each event will be available at the door. For more information, see www.bricolageartsfestival.org or call 336-908-3242. Here is a schedule:

Thursday, Nov. 1

AESTUO-DOGMA ENGINE: 7 p.m., Reynolds Auditorium, 301 N. Hawthorne Road. Karola Luttringhaus of alban elved dance company and Jennifer Wynn O’Kelly will combine lighting, sculpture, music, costuming and dance. Admission $10, $6 for children 12 and younger.

MURAL UNVEILING: 7 p.m., Henry and Washington streets, Eden. Jack Stone and Kitty Williams will unveil their public-art mural titled River Boat Men: Dan River Trading, 1835. Admission $10, $6 for children 12 and younger.

ON TRACK, AN INTERACTIVE FILM SCREENING: 7 p.m., Moring Arts Center, 123 Sunset Ave., Asheboro. Philip Shore and Zora Medor will use archival photos, new film footage and live actors to tell the story of trains and their history in our region. Admission $10, $6 for children 12 and younger.

Friday, Nov. 2

LISTEN! 7 p.m., Bishop McGuinness High School, 1725 N.C. 66 South, Kernersville. Bonnie Duckworth and Barbara Presnell will present a spiritual program with poetry and music performed by an eight-person orchestra, choir members and dancers. Admission $10, $6 for children 12 and younger.

PIEDMONT STRUT, A JAZZ-BLUES CONCERT: 7 p.m., Sunset Theatre, 234 Sunset Ave., Asheboro. Mel Jones and Joe Robinson will fuse rural and urban musical styles of the region with acoustic blues and jazz. Admission $10, $6 for children 12 and younger.

ON TRACK: 7 p.m., The Exhibit Center, Reidsville. See Nov. 1.

Saturday, Nov. 3

PIEDMONT STRUT: 7 p.m., Brock Performing Arts Center, 622 N. Main St., Mocksville. See Nov. 2.

ALLUVIAL FUSION, AN INTERACTIVE ARTS INSTALLATION: 2 p.m., RiverMill Village, 1735 Saxapahaw Bethlehem Church Road, Saxapahaw. Artists and musicians of the River Artists Collective will create a site-specific art experience, with the Haw River as their inspiration and backdrop. Admission $10, $6 for children 12 and younger.

ON TRACK: 2 p.m., High Point Museum,., High Point. See Nov. 1.

Sunday, Nov. 4

LISTEN! 3 p.m., Grace Episcopal Church, Lexington. See Nov. 2.

ON TRACK: 2 p.m., The Elon School, 201 S. O’Kelly Ave., Elon. See Nov. 1.

FLOW: 7 p.m., Grimsley High School Auditorium, 801 Westover Terrace, Greensboro. Duane Cyrus of Cyrus Art Production and Virginia Shepley will present a dance-theater show with multimedia scenic elements suspended from the ceiling. Admission $10, $6 for children 12 and younger.

To see more of the Winston-Salem Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.journalnow.com/.

Copyright (c) 2007, Winston-Salem Journal, N.C.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Reagan runners recognize Roberson’s reign: Girls cross-country team will go after state champions.

Posted by Winston Salem | Posted in Winston Salem Journal | Posted on 31-08-2008

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COPYRIGHT 2007 Winston-Salem Journal

Byline: Jay Spivey

Nov. 1–The Reagan cross-country teams are hoping that some of the magic they had in regional competition last weekend will follow them to Tanglewood Park for Saturday’s NCHSAA 3-A championships.

Reagan swept the Midwest 3-A team titles in Charlotte, but Ed Thutt — Reagan’s girls coach — knows that a great deal will have to fall into place for his team to unseat Asheville Roberson, which has won three straight 3-A girls state titles and eight of the past 11.

Last fall at Tanglewood, Roberson finished 60 points ahead of runner-up Asheville and 62 ahead of third-place Reagan.

In regional competition last weekend, Reagan’s girls put their five scoring runners in the top 12 and won the Midwest title with 40 points. Roberson won the West with 18 points, three off a perfect score.

Laurie Humphrey led Reagan with a third-place regional finish (19:45), and Leslie Raymond (fourth in 19:47), Elizabeth Chafee (10th in 20:17), Kayla Polonsky (11th in 20:34) and Shelby Phillips (12th in 20:36) also had strong showings.

Caroline Kirby, the two-time defending state champion, led Roberson with a regional victory in 19:16. Marie Mauhar (second in 19:21), Stephanie Chapman (fourth in 19:37), Laura Hoer (fifth in 19:40), Zoe Dubin (sixth in 19:42) and Kylie Smith (ninth in 20:02) also finished in the top 10, and Smith didn’t factor into the team scoring.

Thutt said that winning Saturday isn’t as important as having his runners do their best in a state-championship atmosphere.

“We expected them to do well (at the regional), but as always, we are pleasantly surprised when they exceed our expectations,” Thutt said. “Our philosophy is that we want these kids to be the best athletes that they can be. We don’t put an emphasis on winning certain things. We just want them to perform the best they can.

Thutt said he hopes that Reagan can one day be on the same level as Roberson.

“They’re a fantastic program, they have been for a long time,” Thutt said. “We would love to achieve the same success that they have.”

Thutt said that even though the Raiders appear to have the depth to push Roberson, depth isn’t one of his team’s strengths. He wants his runners to go out quickly and maintain their positions.

Humphrey, who finished seventh in last year’s state meet in 19:41, said that Reagan has a better chance of defeating Roberson than it would appear to on paper.

“I really do (we have a chance to win),” she said.

“I really think our team has a whole lot of talent, and I think it’s a possibility that we can.

“Not to say that Roberson is not good, because they have so much talent. I think our team can really put up a fight because we work really hard and we want it a lot.”

Raymond, who was 26th at last year’s state meet, said that one of the things that allows the Raiders to compete at a high level comes from doing things together other than running. She said that team members meet the night before races for pasta parties.

She also said that Reagan’s top five runners need to finish 20th or higher.

“Everybody will have to be out there, like leaving nothing on the course,” Raymond said.

“This is going to be our last race (of the year), so you shouldn’t want to leave anything.

“You should want to race your hardest, leave nothing behind, and nothing to regret.”

The Reagan boys, led by Nick Freeman and Austin Jones, will be trying to improve on a fifth-place finish at last year’s state meet.

Freeman, a senior, was third in last weekend’s regional (16:13), Jones was fifth (16:47), and Jack Anderson (11th in 17:14) and Seth Anderson (13th in 17:19) contributed to the team victory.

At last year’s 3-A state meet, Jones was 24th, and Freeman ran 36th while battling tendinitis.

“I think they main difference between this meet and all the other ones is this is my last one,” Freeman said of Saturday’s race. “So I’m just going to go out with a strong finish. I’m just going to try and run hard. If I do well, that will be great, and if I don’t do so well, then I know that I came and tried hard.”

Ryan Hill of Hickory is the individual favorite and two-time defending champion.

Mooresville, led by Patrick Campbell, is the favorite to repeat as the team champion, and Coach Sinclair Seavey of Reagan said that his goal is a top-four finish.

“We’ve been ranked anywhere between third and fourth throughout the course of this year,” Seavey said, referring to the state coaches’ poll, “so I hope that we can be in that range — third or fourth. If we get the opportunity to stand on that platform (top three), I’ll be one of the happiest guys here.”

To see more of the Winston-Salem Journal, or to subscribe to the newspaper, go to http://www.journalnow.com/.

Copyright (c) 2007, Winston-Salem Journal, N.C.

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Office building to be built near new Winston-Salem stadium

Posted by Winston Salem | Posted in Winston Salem Journal | Posted on 21-08-2008

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WINSTON-SALEM — A six-story office building will be the first phase of mixed-use development outside Winston-Salem’s new downtown baseball stadium, team officials announced Tuesday night.

At a reception for about 200 business leaders in the city, Billy Prim, owner of the Warthogs — who will be renamed once they move downtown next year — and owner of Primo Properties said the first two floors of the 118,000 square foot, to be built behind the stadium’s right field wall, building will be open by the first game next April.

Craig Davis Properties and Commercial Realty Advisors are assisting Primo Properties in the joint venture, to be called One Ballpark Center.

Prim said the building has received commitments for 42,500 square feet of space, including offices for the team’s headquarters and a team store.

Prim also said a restaurant has signed on for the concourse level right, but he declined to name specifically any of the tenants.

The first 32,000 square feet of the building will be ready by Opening Day next year. The remainder will be complete by the first game of 2010, Prim said.

Developers hope the $22.6 million stadium will attract about $189 million in investments in the area which sits just off Business 40 near Peters Creek Parkway.

While the street level may include some retail, he said the Class A office suites for businesses will start at about 5,500 and be available for purchase, probably in the range of $200 to $225 per square foot.